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Unnamed Road, Pirates Well Settlement, The Bahamas
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Welcome to the Authentic Pirate Living History Group, a small corner of Facebook for those who would like to "get it right" to hide from Hollywood and pop-culture "sexy" pirate girls. This is a place for discussion of the history and material culture of real, historical, pirates of the "Golden Age" (however you choose to define it, but for now let's say European/American pirates, 1690-1725 ish) and their portrayal at living history and educational events. Feel free to invite other like minded friends.

Anyone posting pictures of themselves in Jack Sparrow outfits or typing in "pyratese" will be mercilessly mocked and jeered. Please leave your bucket boots at the door.

If you have a specific question, it may already have been asked, and it's recommended that you have a quick browse through this document to see links to previous discussions. There is no harm, however in asking a question again, even if it's been answered before, because research here is ever ongoing, and it's likely that something new could be added.

https://www.facebook.com/notes/authentic-pirate-living-history/informative-discussions-of-aplh/567098313387200

Wednesday December 13th, 2017 - 7:09 pm

Please read, enjoy, and feel free to share! ... See MoreSee Less

Wednesday December 13th, 2017 - 12:54 am

So, in a lot of pirate media, pirates are portrayed predominantly as English, with some Scottish or Irish thrown in. I've heard of French pirates (not so many Spanish pirates, but I imagine the existed). But what about Eastern Europe? Like Russia and Sweden and Holland (I know for 21 years after 1700 the Russians and Swedes were preoccupied with something else... if you know what I mean..)

But is there any evidence to suggest Russians/ Swedes etc. mingled with French, British and Spanish pirates in the West Indies? Modern day culture likes to make pirates diverse by adding in Japanese or Chinese pirates but I've not seem anything relating to Russians and Swedes...
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Furthermore, what of Greeks or Italians at this time? Now a little research shows there was no established country as Greece suring our period (I believe it was controlled by the Ottomans)

Earlier in the 17th century there were quite a few Dutch buccaneers and lots of French ones, but by the early 18th century they were mostly British and a few French. However, there was at least one Italian privateer in Spanish service I know of (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matthew_Luke) and I've read that there were Greeks who ended up in Spanish service as well. Some of those could have ended up as pirates I suppose. The Danish also had some colonies in the Caribbean during this time (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danish_West_Indies) and Sweden had a few mostly failed colonial ambitions in the West Indies but I'm not sure any colonies in the early 18th century. Russia at this time was just undergoing the reforms of Peter the Great and had basically just come out of the Middle Ages so the only colonial endeavors they were attempting at this time were in Central Asian and Siberia.

Loved Matthew Luke's story. Esp. the part when he was arressted by the English and 40 of them were hanged for piracy after Spain tried to intervene 😂😂

They were busy A-pirating in their own back yards...The Baltic and the Med/Aegean

Dirk Chivers was Dutch...Jose Gaspar was Spanish

Marcus Rediker did a fairly far-reaching analysis of the nationalities of pirates active in the Atlantic, 1716-1726. It's not perfect, obviously, because biographical data for *every* pirate is not available, but the broad trends it shows should be reasonably accurate for that time and place. He calculated the national make-up as follows: English - 47.4% Irish - 9.8% Scottish - 6.3% Welsh - 4% "American" (including West Indies) - approx 25% Other (Dutch, French, Portuguese, Danish, Belgian, Swedish, African) - 6.9% As you can see, the overwhelming majority were Anglophones, and this trend is supported by contemporary sources, such as Charles Johnson who wrote at length in the introduction to the GHP about why most pirates of the age were English and very few were Dutch. How far that analysis can be applied to, say, Indian Ocean pirates of the 1690s remains to be seen. From my own perusal of documents relating to them I'd suggest that there was probably a greater number of other European nationals pirating there, but still with a preponderance of Anglophones. Certainly the Indian Moghuls had no difficulty in assuming that any time one of their ships was attacked it was the work of 'English' pirates.

I had to look up an old thread on the Pyracy Pub to get Rediker's figures (easier than getting up and going to the bookshelf). The thread is quite interesting if you want to know more: pyracy.com/index.php?/topic/18721-gaop-pirate-nationalities/

I mostly study 17th century pirates in the West Indies, and there were a lot of Dutch pirates. As for Swedes, Germans, and Russians, there was a reference to a ship from Brandenburg that had these nationalities on board.

Stepan Razin, Russian pirate from the early buccaneer era: www.cindyvallar.com/razin.html

There's also John Derdrake. Danish, but sailed for Russia under Peter the Great. Supposedly, anyway - he's probably fictional. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Derdrake

Peter Cornelius Hoof on the Whydah was Swedish.

I know a guy who does a Hungarian pirate...

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Tuesday December 12th, 2017 - 1:45 am

I've had my eye on this for a little while for use as a general purpose/ eating knife for GAoP. It's a Henry VIII style hubting knife. However, with that said, the dark grip (my guess is it's either horn or ebony) and the crossguard with the shell decoration is typical of what I've seen on hunting SWORDS during GAoP and throughout the 1700's. It may be a bit too 'gentlemanly' for pirates. Especially the engraving. (And aforesaid engraving includes a Tudor rose) but maybe that can be buffed off.

The only thing I can see that gives it away os thebwide base on the pommel end of the grip. Chances are I'll buy it anyway for my personal collection but it would be nice to use it for reenactment as well.

shop.royalarmouries.org/arms-and-armour/historic-replicas/historical-daggers/king-henry-hunting-d...
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Ive had my eye on this for a little while for use as a general purpose/ eating knife for GAoP. Its a Henry VIII style hubting knife. However, with that said, the dark grip (my guess is its either horn or ebony) and the crossguard with the shell decoration is typical of what Ive seen on hunting SWORDS during GAoP and throughout the 1700s. It may be a bit too gentlemanly for pirates. Especially the engraving. (And aforesaid engraving includes a Tudor rose) but maybe that can be buffed off.
 
The only thing I can see that gives it away os thebwide base on the pommel end of the grip. Chances are Ill buy it anyway for my personal collection but it would be nice to use it for reenactment as well.
 
https://shop.royalarmouries.org/arms-and-armour/historic-replicas/historical-daggers/king-henry-hunting-dagger-royal-armouries-collection.html

 

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Please note that this is blunted, so you would have to grind an edge to use it... Also, although I can't see measurements on the web page, it may be quite long for a general purpose/eating knife. Fine if you are buying it anyway, but don't get attached to using it unless you have seen it ahead of time and know that these issues aren't going to stop you.

Its a nice one. Not good for combat in reenactment i would guess.

I have one on the workbench at the moment...it is nice, but a weapon, not a general purpose or eating knife...the blade is c14" long for starters...

Thanks for the info, guys

Bit pointy for most groups combat regs and unwieldy for eating... pretty tho', handle's a bit too fat at the top to my eye. For eating, cutting, bread, cheese, sausage etc and general furtling about in camp invest in a folding knife.

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Saturday December 9th, 2017 - 11:02 pm

Bought this some years ago 3rd hand when I first started getting involved in reenactment...mostly because the price was right & I needed a jacket. Have gotten something a wee bit more correct now, but have wondered - any idea what time period this would be from, or is it a total theatrical piece, with the wildly buttoned sleeves and such? Since it has a raggedy satin-type lining, I'm guessing costume piece...but just wondered if it had a basis in reality in some century or another... ... See MoreSee Less

Bought this some years ago 3rd hand when I first started getting involved in reenactment...mostly because the price was right & I needed a jacket.  Have gotten something a wee bit more correct now, but have wondered - any idea what time period this would be from, or is it a total theatrical piece, with the wildly buttoned sleeves and such?  Since it has a raggedy satin-type lining, Im guessing costume piece...but just wondered if it had a basis in reality in some century or another...

 

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Early 1800s

Not in my reality !! LOL

To me it looks like an attempt at a 17th century trimmed doublet. Or possibly an attempt at a 17th century dutch coat. Either way I think its a great looking piece.

Am wondering how this would look with a great kilt. Can you take the sleeves off from the shoulder?

There's a coat pre English civil war that buttons up under the sleeves and down the sides.

I thought a cassock but a cassock is typically longer than what we see here. Its more of a riding garment. If you search Sally Green 17th century you'll see some of what she makes. It compares to some of here items but I think it falls short of being period correct. Only because it looks like a combination of items. The cassock also buttons all the way up the sleeves and all the way up the sides to make a cape.

PM sent

Chris and Daniel answered this question nicely

Thanks for all the awesome answers! I really appreciate it! Thanks too for the Sally Green reference - I had a look, and yes, I do see some similarities...especially to the casaque, except that the sleeves on mine don't fully unbutton...kind of an adaptation of it, for whatever reason. But very cool to see this jacket might have been based on an actual piece!

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Saturday December 9th, 2017 - 12:58 am

How's this for a golden age compass? It's supposed to be 17th century anyway and it looks pretty close to 17th/ 18th century examples

www.medieval-arms.co.uk/detail/id/250/name/pocket-compass,-france-17th-century#picture
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Hows this for a golden age compass? Its supposed to be 17th century anyway and it looks pretty close to 17th/ 18th century examples
 
https://www.medieval-arms.co.uk/detail/id/250/name/pocket-compass,-france-17th-century#picture

 

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Judging just on beauty, I love it. I am no expert in the authenticity area....just a student and reader. But stuff like that is what catches my eye.

Go to the Greenwich Maritime Museum website, look under collections, and check out originals.

The main difference between period compasses and modern made cheap ones is that before the 20th century the whole card turned, not just the needle. It makes a huge difference in how you use it. If just the needle moves, I'd pss on it.

The Scheepvaartmuseum in Amsterdamn has some examples, sadly it seems I did not take any photos of them while I was there. Similarly, the Royal Ontario Museum has a single example (in incredibly good condition), again I did not take any photos of this one either when I was there a couple of weeks ago, as I knew I had a photo from a previous trip (from years ago)... and now I can not even find that old photo.

Friday December 8th, 2017 - 11:53 pm

Was this style hat around during the Golden age? ... See MoreSee Less

Was this style hat around during the Golden age?

 

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Not that I've seen

They did have a sort of beanie woollen hat as was found in a wreck off guernsey I believe that sunk during the GAoP period. The specimen they found didnt have a pompom on top though.

Look for a correct Monmouth Cap..

Also a thrummed cap, shaggy all over. Or a stripey one, several of those of the right date in the Rijksmuseum. www.rijksmuseum.nl/nl/rijksstudio/1753218--Marieke/verzamelingen/muts?ii=0&p=0

That's a copy of the hat found on the wreck of the British ship "Carleton" which went down in 1785.

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Friday December 8th, 2017 - 6:44 pm

I've seen a few posts in this group about bags and such. I bought what is known as a haversack for my costum back in July. I needed it for Comic Con, and I wasn't a member of this group yet. Plus, it was £5 and I can always repurpose it. Anywho, I've seen the word 'snapsack' mentioned a few times whike search this group and when I did a google search, I found many pictures of this example.

Is this what I'd need for a period correct bag? Furthermore, what would be the period term for such a bag and what would sailors typically carry inside it?
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Ive seen a few posts in this group about bags and such. I bought what is known as a haversack for my costum back in July. I needed it for Comic Con, and I wasnt a member of this group yet. Plus, it was £5 and I can always repurpose it. Anywho, Ive seen the word snapsack mentioned a few times whike search this group and when I did a google search, I found many pictures of this example.
 
Is this what Id need for a period correct bag? Furthermore, what would be the period term for such a bag and what would sailors typically carry inside it?

 

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Snapsack or Knapsack. I made one. I know they are good for around rev war. I carry extra clothes. Socks. Plate and bowl. Cup. Food. I do that impression as well so I carry a bedroll.

I used to carry a haversack but that is more for soldiers.

I’ve heard that they carried ditty bag but I think that is later as well.

I don't usually carry one as Indon't have excess gear. But they come in handy for events for things you've bought

Very true

I travel and do a lot of battles and over night encampments.

Cody is right. Sailors normally did not like wearing haversacks, seeing them as the mark of a soldier. A small seabag/ditty bag was probably preferred.

Check out market wallets.

Snapsacks are period correct...they show up in many paintings of the period. I never heard of a different name for them, only the modern 'snapsack' so perhaps that was the name then as well. These come in very handy for festivals and such where you're walking around in garb, but still want your wallet, cell phone, and other modern items.

According to the OED, the earliest term is knapsack but that's so associated with the 18th century messenger bag that many 17th century reenactors use the alternate term snapsack. This started as a blanket roll that was tied and slung over the shoulder but later, armies commissioned leather bags for soldiers to use.

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Gerard Leone shared The History Project's video to the group: Authentic Pirate Living History 1690-1730.
Gerard Leone

Friday December 8th, 2017 - 9:29 am

The History Project
EXPRESSIONS: COLD ENOUGH TO FREEZE THE BALLS OFF OF A BRASS MONKEY

The meaning behind the expression.....
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The History Project

 

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Always thought the cannonball connection was a reeeeeeeeal long stretch. Where I come from, the expression in vogue was "Colder than a dead witches tit in a brass bra." I am sure that someone, somewhere has recorded the "real" origin of that phrase, perhaps connecting it to an ancient form of execution or something equally outlandish.

Its just another of those phrases which roll of the tongue for effect...trying to extract too much of the deep inner meaning of life from them is pointless...to use another is appropriate, "taking a running poke at a rolling doughnut" .

Now "It was so cold today I saw a dog frozen to a fire hydrant!" is more realistic than cannon balls in a pyramid stack on deck of a ship!

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Friday December 8th, 2017 - 8:27 am

Thank ye for the add 😊 ... See MoreSee Less

 

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☠️⚔️☠️

Thursday December 7th, 2017 - 7:00 pm

I hope you don't mind if I post this here. I'm just interested in the answers I'll get. But, to make it more relevant, who would you chose from the GAOP?

For me, personally, it would be Charles Vane. Of the little that I have read on him, he certainly seems the most interesting character from this period
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I hope you dont mind if I post this here. Im just interested in the answers Ill get. But, to make it more relevant, who would you chose from the GAOP?
 
For me, personally, it would be Charles Vane. Of the little that I have read on him, he certainly seems the most interesting character from this period

 

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Not our usual kind of post but I think it might provoke some interesting discussion, and a change is as good as a rest. I think Henry Every must have been a fascinating character (obviously), but if I spent an hour with him I'd always wonder whether I should have picked Richard Taylor or Mary Read instead.

I have the same problem as there are so many people to chose from. I do like the thought of Mary Read, though, or even Anne Bonney. It would be insightful to hear first hand what it was like to be a woman among so many men...

Stede Bonnet

Not a pirate, but Samuel Langhorne Clemens (Mark Twain) would be a hoot.

Tough one, I think I’d go with Thatch. To be with such an iconic figure of GaOP would be phenomenal...and we would drink!!!!!! That one hour we’ll consume a lot of alcohol and before the 60th minute is out we’ll drink to damnation and wish him well before I see him again, in this world or the one below 😜🤘🏻👊🏻👍🏻⚔️⚓️☠️

Anne Bonny. Was she a beautiful redhead as they usually depict her or a hag? My alternative would be LaBuse. He knew the whole deal, was probably quite the tough guy

Henry Morgan, circa 1675. And, I’d want to be in Port Royal during its heyday while we talked, for the same reasons you say you’d go to Nassau.

Wow...tough one. Probably either Vane or Edward England

What an interesting question! From the GAoP? For me, it would be Qm. Richard Noland. There’s not much about him in the historical record, but what’s there is fascinating: veteran of Queen Anne’s War, member of the Flying Gang, friend to Teach, recruiting officer for Benjamin Hornigold, quartermaster to Sam Bellamy, and captain of the Anne Galley (a surviving Whydah consort) on the night the nor’easter took most of her fleet low. An Irishman known as a capable, innovative officer with the “gift of blarney.” Along with Hornigold, he took the pardon, likely exited the life, and appeared as character witness in multiple pirate trials. Altogether, a fascinating character at the edge of the spotlight. I’ve portrayed him for years (first for National Geographic’s Real Pirates exhibit), so I feel very close to him. But I’ve always wondered what I’ve gotten right factually, right “in spirit,” and just completely wrong.

My Grandpop....gone almost 26 years now

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Thursday December 7th, 2017 - 3:14 pm

Would someone here be able to explain to me the difference between tying a sailor's queue in the GAOP and what we today call a ponytail? Thank you! ... See MoreSee Less

 

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They didn't have sailor's queues during the GAOP. That came about in the later 18th century.

OK. Is there any info about how they would have kept their hair out of the way while working?

As far as I've seen and read, they didn't wear their hair that long that long that something would have to be done to keep it out of the way.

what even is a Sailor's queue? I've never heard of it before

The queue is not naked hair, like a ponytail, it is wrapped up in cloth, and coated in something, tar I believe being the norm. Hair that gets in the way in a working context gets torn out...it can be unpleasant, and even dangerous, but it is self regulating...

Didn’t British infantry have long hair in a club or a queue and coated with bear grease in the 1770’s? www.google.com/amp/s/amp.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/30qp74/did_the_british_soldiers_real...

More military hair & grooming from that period - www.scribd.com/document/260315949/Soldier-Hygiene-Grooming-Laundry

Obviously sailors were not infantry, and pirates were not under military discipline. But it is clear that one alternative to short hair in the period would have been long hair in a club or queue.

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Thursday December 7th, 2017 - 2:19 pm

How was money divided among pirate crews? I've read countless times that each man would get a share each, plus comoensation for injuries, officers to get 1 and a half shares and the captain to get 2 shares.

But I've also read how democratic they were and that all men on a pirate ship were absoloutely equal.. Which of these is more likely? Or, rather, the norm as it could vary shio to ship...
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Do you want the short answer or the very very long answer?

This table shows the comparative rewards offered in various maritime services, including all of the pirate crews I was able to find decent evidence for.

Compensation for injury is listed only in Bart Robert's code iirc

It's listed in several, but I know of only one instance in which it was actually paid out. Thomas Anstis' company never had enough money to pay out the kind of sums on offer as smart money, for example.

in pieces of eight of course haha

The other thing to question is how fair this division was in practice. A gold piece is a gold piece, but it is likely that things like stones, jewlry could be better assesed by those more used to dealing with them than a common seaman..they may have got a share, but to what extent was it a fair share?

I always love a good discussion about the 'egalitarian democracy,' it's kind of my thing. Essentially, while every crew was different, there were certain trends. There's evidence of voting on important issues in lot's of crews, enough for us to say that it was a common feature of pirates of the 'golden age,' but unsurprisingly, it's a lot more nuanced than that. For example, the proportion of the crew who were entitled to vote varied massively from around 20% to around 80%, and I don't know of a single crew in which every person on board the ship had a vote. Roberts' articles state that 'every man' was entitled to vote, but it is clear that that did not actually include *every* man. There's also the question of whether the outcome of the vote was always respected, and it's clear that in some cases it was not: one crew sailing in the Atlantic voted on whether to go to the Pacific or the Indian Ocean, and the crew overwhelmingly chose the Pacific but since everyone who could navigate had voted for the Indian Ocean that was where they went. One issue, not strictly relevant, is whether pirate crews were *more* democratic than society at large. It's certainly true that nobody voted on anything much in the Royal Navy, but that's not a complete comparison because pirates' collective experience included far more than just the RN and in many walks of life voting on important local issues was commonplace. As for egalitarianism, that's easier. Every pirate crew I've ever looked into had hierarchies. As you can see from the table above the division of profit was not much more level in the average pirate crew than in many other trades, but there were also social and professional hierarchies at play in pirate crews. The difference in standing between a successful pirate captain and the slave who pumped the bilges could be enormous.

There may be things that you can run as a pure democracy in theory, there are fewer in practice, and a fighting ship at sea is not one of them. Without clear chains of command, a pirate ship is likely to have been a total disaster. That is not to say that there was not more imput from below than may have been typical in the period, but I think it would have to be more in the general policy /distribution of loot side, not in the practical running, let alone fighting of the ship.

I think you are probably right about things like being freer with rations...but the effect was probably that they ran out, whereas in the regular service this was rare ..even short rations were supposed to be compensated.,

It is not considered enough how hard it was to run a ship in this period...even the regular navies fond it frequently a struggle. Doing so as an "illegal" must have been even harder..yes, there were clearly places where pirates were tolerated, and occasionally even welcomed, but this is by no means the same as having dockyards, storehouses and skilled workmen on tap.

Agree. They would also almost certainly be expected to pay cash up front, possibly even over the odds..giving credit to a pirate would not exactly be the best risk. I am sure that they did their best to steal stuff, but the chances of getting what they needed was small...a merchant ship, for example, would have had as small a crew as possible, and rations and things would have been proportional, so the chances of seizing enough would be low in things like food, drink, powder etc.

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Jeff Parr shared James Moore's post to the group: Authentic Pirate Living History 1690-1730.
Jeff Parr

Thursday December 7th, 2017 - 12:28 pm

Here is some period music.Here is the period Christmas hymn, with musical notation, "The Angels Sung A Carol". The lyrics are by Edward Taylor, 1712 and the music is by Orlando Gibbons, 1623.

www.18thCenturyBibles.org
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Here is some period music.

Thursday December 7th, 2017 - 10:54 am

A quick question on Royal Navy Ensigns during this period. Up until 1864, the different ensigns denoted rank (Admiral of the White, Red, and Blue in rank respectively) however I have reed elsewhere that during the Golden age, the different colors denoted station: Red = Caribbean and Northeast Atlantic, Blue= East Atlantic, and White= Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean.

Any know of any sources that may clear this up?
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Don’t know any sources, but my understanding is that they were used for different things at different times in different places. You may need to specify a year and location to get specific info.

Sounds unlikely....possibly it is simply a case of admirals of that particular status being the area commander?

I thought they were just different squadrons .....

Yes, it's just different squadrons. The RN had three squadrons: red, white, and blue, and each had three admirals. The position and colour of the flag indicated who was on board the ship: flown at the main topmast head was an admiral, flown off the foremast was a vice-admiral, and flown off the mizzen was a rear admiral. Flown as an ensign meant no admiral aboard. The familiar St. George's cross was added to the white ensign because there had been incidents in which ships of the white squadron had been mistake for French ships, or vice versa, due to the French naval ensign at this time being a plain white flag (I kid you not).

With a white cross, tho!

Was this to assist in speeding up surrenders?

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Tuesday December 5th, 2017 - 7:29 pm

I tried looking at some clothing made from velvet in the GAoP period and going by these pictures, it seems pretty accessable for Admirals (see John Benbow holding the hanger) and other people who were 'well to do'.

(I'd assume that what the Good Admiral is wearing in the portrait isn't what he'd wear to sea)

However, on thinking on it a little more, I've come to wonder if this is even velvet at all? Was I wrong in thinking this is velvet as I now suspect it to be silk
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I tried looking at some clothing made from velvet in the GAoP period and going by these pictures, it seems pretty accessable for Admirals (see John Benbow holding the hanger) and other people who were well to do.
 
(Id assume that what the Good Admiral is wearing in the portrait isnt what hed wear to sea)
 
However, on thinking on it a little more, Ive come to wonder if this is even velvet at all? Was I wrong in thinking this is velvet as I now suspect it to be silk

 

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From what I understand, the velvet of the time was, in fact, made from silk.

Not sure how it applies to the interest of pirates. The complaint I have about piratical events is that almost all who attend in costume seems to be extremely successful captains or admirals. Most pirates were happy to capture Sugar and tobacco and goods they could sell. I doubt many captured bolts or velvet and employed tailors to make elaborate coats for portraits.

Velvet was made from an odd loom using 2 interlocked silks almost felted together.

An idea of how our crew does the 17teens

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Brian Carpy shared Privateer Media, LLC's post to the group: Authentic Pirate Living History 1690-1730.
Brian Carpy

Tuesday December 5th, 2017 - 1:15 pm

Just in time for the holidays.....

Does someone on your gift list need artillery? We have a new, never fired SBR Verbruggen barrel that's been sitting in our workshop for a while that we don't really have any plans for. Marked SBR. 2.25" bore, steel lined. $2500.

Or need to fortify your navy? For sale is a 20' sailing skiff rigged for historical work. Built by Hankins in 1985, it's one of only four (with one in the Smithsonian). Restored by us in 2009, it's seen use in numerous films and print work, including the inside cover of the 2015 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit edition (boat is rated for twelve SI super models.) Cedar on oak, copper fastened, sprit rig with jib, canvas sails by Tentsmiths, hidden 12v bilge pump w/battery, thole pins, oars (4), anchor, life jackets. Photo is of full restoration in 2009. Boat is rated 98%, comes with trailer. Stored indoors, free winter storage until spring 2018. $7500.

Cheers!
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Sonya Miller and Darin King looks good.

What do you want for it?

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Country The Bahamas
State/Province Mayaguana
distance: 703 Miles
Address Unnamed Road, Pirates Well Settlement, The Bahamas
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