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The Crew of the Scavenger is an authentic, living history pirate group based in Florida. Our main goal is to realistically portray a pirate crew from the “Golden Age of Piracy”, between about 1710 and 1725, as they might have appeared while ashore in a town like Nassau or Port Royal. All of our clothing is as close to period correct as possible, from the designs, to the materials. The same goes for our weapons, be it swords, pistols, or boarding axes. If it wasn’t around by 1720, our goal is that it won’t be seen on us.

We attend pirate festivals around the state, host a private living history encampment for pirate reenactors on an island in the Gulf of Mexico, and take a yearly trip to meet up with other reenactors in Virginia and Maryland in places like Colonial Williamsburg and Historic Saint Mary’s City.
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The Crew of the Scavenger added 32 new photos.
The Crew of the Scavenger

Wednesday August 26th, 2020 - 5:56 pm

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Exceptionally well turn'd out gents! Images well took!

The Crew of the Scavenger added a new photo.
The Crew of the Scavenger

Sunday August 9th, 2015 - 6:06 pm

Jonathan Connolly

Able Seaman

Jonathan “Jno.” Connolly was born in 1676 in the northern part of Braintree, near the settlement of Mount Wollaston, in the Massachusetts colony. The son of a tavern-keeper, Jonathan spent much of his early years assisting with the various duties particular to tavern-keeping; especially the brewing of his father’s ales, which were known for their pleasing taste and strength. Jonathan would often accompany his father into Boston Town to purchase barley malt, wine and spirits, as well as other provender for the tavern. At the harbor, young Jonathan watched sea-going craft of all sorts, either at anchor or fastened to the quay, unloading goods, oftentimes wishing he was going to set sail in one of those vessels to see the world.

Upon his 13th year, Jonathan’s father would often send him, alone, with the family ox-cart into Boston to retrieve goods for the tavern. On one such excursion into town, Jonathan heard of an expedition that was forming to attack the French at Port Royal, Nova Scotia, under Major General William Phips. Ships were being fitted out for the expedition and crews were being sought. This seemed like the perfect escape from the dull drudgery of tavern-keeping. Spending only what was needed to outfit himself with clothing and equipment for the expedition, he left the ox-cart and the remainder of his father's money with a local family friend. Jonathan lied about his age and experience and signed aboard the sloop “Mary.” While the older, more experienced, hands could tell that he had never been to sea before, his experience on small fishing boats, coupled with an ability to learn quickly, helped Jonathan adapt to sea-going life rather rapidly.

The expedition was an incredible success: Phips and his fleet arrived at Port Royal and surprised an overwhelmed and small French garrison that occupied the dilapidated fortifications, no shots were fired. For reasons unknown to Jonathan, the English soldiers and sailors were allowed to sack Port Royal and make off with the townspeoples valuables. Jonathan, along with the rest of the expedition, returned to Boston Town triumphant heroes.

With some plunder in his possession that needed to be turned into specie, Connolly went ashore to find a buyer of the candlesticks, silver, clothing, shoe buckles, and any of the other myriad bits of loot he had been able to carry back to the Mary. Given his youth, it was difficult to get a decent exchange for the goods, but some merchants, in patriotic zeal, were willing to purchase the goods of those who took part in the victory. He had been cheated, but with some coin in his pocket (though not enough) Connolly signed aboard a merchant vessel bound for the West Indies.

The next two decades saw Connolly on various merchant ships that plied the waters between New England and the West Indies. During this time, Connolly learned the ropes and how to man the various collection artillery pieces that might be aboard a merchant ship; although gun drill was rare. Some ship’s masters were fair, others made the cruise a veritable “Hell afloat.”

In 1711, Boston Town was in an uproar, Royal Navy vessels were anchored in Boston harbor and press gangs were everywhere. The current war with Spain and France was at its height and Jno. Connolly had just returned from the West Indies on a merchantman bearing sugar and molasses. He was well ensconced in one of Boston’s waterfront taverns when the press-gang arrived. He had ordered bowl after bowl of punch, and when the Royal Navy press gang found him, he was unable to put up much resistance. He soon found himself pressed aboard one of the ships under Admiral Walker outfitting for the expedition against Quebec.

The expedition was a failure. Contrary winds and navigational errors resulted in the loss of several ships and several hundred sailors and soldiers. Once the damage was assessed, the expedition was called off and Admiral Walker set sail for England. Connolly was aboard HMS Monmouth, which sailed with Walker for England, the fleet arrived in England on October 10th, 1711. Only a few months later, Monmouth was given orders to sail for Port Royal, Jamaica. The Monmouth was to serve as part of an escort to a handful of merchant vessels, and to relieve HMS Jamaica and take up its position on the Jamaica Station.

Upon reaching Port Royal, the crew of the Monmouth heard news that Queen Anne had ordered a cessation of hostilities and peace was imminent. All but a few of the crew of HMS Monmouth were retained while the rest, Connolly included, were put ashore and discharged. News of the recent wreck of the Spanish fleet off Florida rocked the island and Connolly leaped at the opportunity. He signed aboard the privateer Eagle, which sailed in consort to Captain Jennings’ ship Barsheba. Shortly after Christmas, the two ships stood off the Florida coast observing the wrecks and the encamped Spanish survivors on the shore. Captain Jennings landed a strong force upon the shore and marched toward the Spanish, who surrendered without a fight. The Spanish divulged the location of the treasure that they had salvaged and buried before departing. Jno. was among those landed upon the shore to excavate the buried treasure and transport it back to their ships. Long, grueling days were spent hauling gold and silver to the ships. At length, it was decided that there was enough loot aboard the ships that diving upon the wrecks was unnecessary.

After a length of time, as a member of Jennings’ crew, Connolly returned to Jamaica and found lodging in Port Royal with the money he had, and awaited the admiralty court to assess the value of everything taken during the cruise, under Jennings, and for his share. After a few weeks, a notice was put out for Jennings’ men to assemble to be paid out their share. It was a pretty penny and all in coin! With enough money in his pocket to live on for a while, Connolly decided it might be time to return to Massachusetts, so he signed aboard a ship hauling molasses and rum to Boston Town. Connolly smelled trouble as soon as he stepped aboard the Jezebel, the bosun was indiscriminately beating the crew as they worked. He had seen this before, this was sure to be “Hell afloat". It was, however, the only ship headed to New England that time of year.

Punishments were frequent for even small infractions and sometimes arbitrary. By the time the Jezebel had reached the Chesapeake Bay, to take on water and provisions, Connolly had enough. During the middle watch, while the Jezebel was anchored off of Yorktown, Connolly went over the side and into one of the ship’s boats that was tied up alongside. He beached the boat along a deserted beach, just downstream of the town, set it adrift, and headed on-foot toward the Yorktown waterfront.

Connolly knew that his absence aboard the Jezebel would soon be discovered, but the ship would not wait to search the countryside for him as they had a deadline to meet in Boston. He knew that the tyrant of a captain wouldn’t leave Yorktown until he put out a desertion notice. With no printer in Yorktown several copies would be handwritten, it would likely see little interest. Not wanting to take his chances dallying in Yorktown, Connolly set out to find a ride to Williamsburg. A friendly barmaid was very helpful in this regard, saying her father was leaving with a wagonload of goods, in the morning; she seemed to understand that discretion was of utmost importance.

Connolly found Williamsburg a right affable city, the tavern-keepers were eager to take his money and keep his tankard full. One night, he was having a remarkable streak of luck playing whist. He won hand after hand, trick after trick! All of a sudden, some strangers walked in. By their dress, they were clearly acquainted with the sea, like Connolly, and one of them sat down at the same gaming table. After a few hands, if soon became clear to Connolly that he sat opposite Captain Jack Sawford, who was his team for the game!

Unfortunately, luck seemed to not be in Connolly and Sawford’s favor. The other team, who were locals that apparently knew each other fairly well, took trick after trick and won several hands; in fact, they won every hand after that. One of Sawford’s men was watching the game, with intent, from another table. After the fourth losing hand, he shot up and yelled “Cheat! God damn you both for cheaters!” to Connolly and Sawford’s opponents, who rose up so quickly their chairs shot out from under them and toppled over. One of the opposing team members stuck his hand into his coat pocket and produced a small pistol. He was about to fire when an empty rum bottle came crashing down on his head, wielded by another one of Sawford’s men. The whole place erupted in a brawl. Not wanting the attention and knowing that the cheating party were well-liked, Connolly suggested to Sawford and his men to run: there was no time to waste in getting out of town.

Sawford’s ship, the Scavenger, was anchored off of a landing on the James River. The group, Connolly included, made haste for the landing with the help of a borrowed wagon and a team of horses. Cutting the horses free, and stashing the wagon in the woods, the group boarded the two small boats the Scavenger’s crew had beached earlier that day and rowed out to the ship. Safely on board, bottles of rum were brought out and the events of the evening were recounted to the rest of the ships crew. In between swigs of rum, Connolly conversed with his newfound friends, and in doing so they found out that many of them had similar experiences in the late war. Many of the crew had even paid a visit to the Spanish wrecks, same as Connolly. It seemed that Connolly was finally among affable fellows and had found a new crew.
... See MoreSee Less

Jonathan Connolly

Able Seaman

Jonathan “Jno.” Connolly was born in 1676 in the northern part of Braintree, near the settlement of Mount Wollaston, in the Massachusetts colony. The son of a tavern-keeper, Jonathan spent much of his early years assisting with the various duties particular to tavern-keeping; especially the brewing of his father’s ales, which were known for their pleasing taste and strength. Jonathan would often accompany his father into Boston Town to purchase barley malt, wine and spirits, as well as other provender for the tavern. At the harbor, young Jonathan watched sea-going craft of all sorts, either at anchor or fastened to the quay, unloading goods, oftentimes wishing he was going to set sail in one of those vessels to see the world.

Upon his 13th year, Jonathan’s father would often send him, alone, with the family ox-cart into Boston to retrieve goods for the tavern. On one such excursion into town, Jonathan heard of an expedition that was forming to attack the French at Port Royal, Nova Scotia, under Major General William Phips. Ships were being fitted out for the expedition and crews were being sought. This seemed like the perfect escape from the dull drudgery of tavern-keeping. Spending only what was needed to outfit himself with clothing and equipment for the expedition, he left the ox-cart and the remainder of his fathers money with a local family friend. Jonathan lied about his age and experience and signed aboard the sloop “Mary.” While the older, more experienced, hands could tell that he had never been to sea before, his experience on small fishing boats, coupled with an ability to learn quickly, helped Jonathan adapt to sea-going life rather rapidly.

The expedition was an incredible success: Phips and his fleet arrived at Port Royal and surprised an overwhelmed and small French garrison that occupied the dilapidated fortifications, no shots were fired. For reasons unknown to Jonathan, the English soldiers and sailors were allowed to sack Port Royal and make off with the townspeoples valuables. Jonathan, along with the rest of the expedition, returned to Boston Town triumphant heroes.

With some plunder in his possession that needed to be turned into specie, Connolly went ashore to find a buyer of the candlesticks, silver, clothing, shoe buckles, and any of the other myriad bits of loot he had been able to carry back to the Mary. Given his youth, it was difficult to get a decent exchange for the goods, but some merchants, in patriotic zeal, were willing to purchase the goods of those who took part in the victory. He had been cheated, but with some coin in his pocket (though not enough) Connolly signed aboard a merchant vessel bound for the West Indies.

The next two decades saw Connolly on various merchant ships that plied the waters between New England and the West Indies. During this time, Connolly learned the ropes and how to man the various collection artillery pieces that might be aboard a merchant ship; although gun drill was rare. Some ship’s masters were fair, others made the cruise a veritable “Hell afloat.”

In 1711, Boston Town was in an uproar, Royal Navy vessels were anchored in Boston harbor and press gangs were everywhere. The current war with Spain and France was at its height and Jno. Connolly had just returned from the West Indies on a merchantman bearing sugar and molasses. He was well ensconced in one of Boston’s waterfront taverns when the press-gang arrived. He had ordered bowl after bowl of punch, and when the Royal Navy press gang found him, he was unable to put up much resistance. He soon found himself pressed aboard one of the ships under Admiral Walker outfitting for the expedition against Quebec.

The expedition was a failure. Contrary winds and navigational errors resulted in the loss of several ships and several hundred sailors and soldiers. Once the damage was assessed, the expedition was called off and Admiral Walker set sail for England. Connolly was aboard HMS Monmouth, which sailed with Walker for England, the fleet arrived in England on October 10th, 1711. Only a few months later, Monmouth was given orders to sail for Port Royal, Jamaica. The Monmouth was to serve as part of an escort to a handful of merchant vessels, and to relieve HMS Jamaica and take up its position on the Jamaica Station.

Upon reaching Port Royal, the crew of the Monmouth heard news that Queen Anne had ordered a cessation of hostilities and peace was imminent. All but a few of the crew of HMS Monmouth were retained while the rest, Connolly included, were put ashore and discharged. News of the recent wreck of the Spanish fleet off Florida rocked the island and Connolly leaped at the opportunity. He signed aboard the privateer Eagle, which sailed in consort to Captain Jennings’ ship Barsheba. Shortly after Christmas, the two ships stood off the Florida coast observing the wrecks and the encamped Spanish survivors on the shore. Captain Jennings landed a strong force upon the shore and marched toward the Spanish, who surrendered without a fight. The Spanish divulged the location of the treasure that they had salvaged and buried before departing. Jno. was among those landed upon the shore to excavate the buried treasure and transport it back to their ships. Long, grueling days were spent hauling gold and silver to the ships. At length, it was decided that there was enough loot aboard the ships that diving upon the wrecks was unnecessary.

After a length of time, as a member of Jennings’ crew, Connolly returned to Jamaica and found lodging in Port Royal with the money he had, and awaited the admiralty court to assess the value of everything taken during the cruise, under Jennings, and for his share. After a few weeks, a notice was put out for Jennings’ men to assemble to be paid out their share. It was a pretty penny and all in coin! With enough money in his pocket to live on for a while, Connolly decided it might be time to return to Massachusetts, so he signed aboard a ship hauling molasses and rum to Boston Town. Connolly smelled trouble as soon as he stepped aboard the Jezebel, the bosun was indiscriminately beating the crew as they worked. He had seen this before, this was sure to be “Hell afloat. It was, however, the only ship headed to New England that time of year.

Punishments were frequent for even small infractions and sometimes arbitrary. By the time the Jezebel had reached the Chesapeake Bay, to take on water and provisions, Connolly had enough. During the middle watch, while the Jezebel was anchored off of Yorktown, Connolly went over the side and into one of the ship’s boats that was tied up alongside. He beached the boat along a deserted beach, just downstream of the town, set it adrift, and headed on-foot toward the Yorktown waterfront.

Connolly knew that his absence aboard the Jezebel would soon be discovered, but the ship would not wait to search the countryside for him as they had a deadline to meet in Boston. He knew that the tyrant of a captain wouldn’t leave Yorktown until he put out a desertion notice. With no printer in Yorktown several copies would be handwritten, it would likely see little interest. Not wanting to take his chances dallying in Yorktown, Connolly set out to find a ride to Williamsburg. A friendly barmaid was very helpful in this regard, saying her father was leaving with a wagonload of goods, in the morning; she seemed to understand that discretion was of utmost importance.

Connolly found Williamsburg a right affable city, the tavern-keepers were eager to take his money and keep his tankard full. One night, he was having a remarkable streak of luck playing whist. He won hand after hand, trick after trick! All of a sudden, some strangers walked in. By their dress, they were clearly acquainted with the sea, like Connolly, and one of them sat down at the same gaming table. After a few hands, if soon became clear to Connolly that he sat opposite Captain Jack Sawford, who was his team for the game!

Unfortunately, luck seemed to not be in Connolly and Sawford’s favor. The other team, who were locals that apparently knew each other fairly well, took trick after trick and won several hands; in fact, they won every hand after that. One of Sawford’s men was watching the game, with intent, from another table. After the fourth losing hand, he shot up and yelled “Cheat! God damn you both for cheaters!” to Connolly and Sawford’s opponents, who rose up so quickly their chairs shot out from under them and toppled over. One of the opposing team members stuck his hand into his coat pocket and produced a small pistol. He was about to fire when an empty rum bottle came crashing down on his head, wielded by another one of Sawford’s men. The whole place erupted in a brawl. Not wanting the attention and knowing that the cheating party were well-liked, Connolly suggested to Sawford and his men to run: there was no time to waste in getting out of town.

Sawford’s ship, the Scavenger, was anchored off of a landing on the James River. The group, Connolly included, made haste for the landing with the help of a borrowed wagon and a team of horses. Cutting the horses free, and stashing the wagon in the woods, the group boarded the two small boats the Scavenger’s crew had beached earlier that day and rowed out to the ship. Safely on board, bottles of rum were brought out and the events of the evening were recounted to the rest of the ships crew. In between swigs of rum, Connolly conversed with his newfound friends, and in doing so they found out that many of them had similar experiences in the late war. Many of the crew had even paid a visit to the Spanish wrecks, same as Connolly. It seemed that Connolly was finally among affable fellows and had found a new crew.

Comment on Facebook

Looks great , nice work

Monday July 27th, 2020 - 12:33 pm

There's always someone quick to point out some of us are too clean for pirates, and we need to dirty and age our kit artificially. To which I explain I launder my kit without modern detergent and let it age as it would have, through regular use.

- Captain Jack Sawford
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Let's face it, as reenactors we interact with the public, so keeping the old, personal hygiene in check is just common sense

Did I ever tell you about my “smell like a Pirate” project?

It did not take very long for my cook’s apron to get that “patina”.

My kit is clean

Never age clothing artificially... gah...

Sorta like a person who takes a perfectly good fire lock and abuses the hell out of it to make it look 200 years old. In the REAL world, you would keep it in as good condition as you could to make it last longer.

What do you use to wash your clothes in?

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Friday July 24th, 2020 - 12:49 am

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The Crew of the Scavenger added a new photo.
The Crew of the Scavenger

Sunday August 9th, 2015 - 6:06 pm

Jack Sawford

Captain

Jack Sawford was born in Saint Mary's City, Maryland, in 1687. After the explosion of the powder magazine in Saint Peter's Freehold rocked the city in 1695, his family relocated to Anne Arundel Town. At the age of 14, he took to sea on a merchant vessel, spending much of his time in and around the West Indies.

At the age of 16, he found himself aboard a resupply ship as part of former Governor Moore's expedition bound for the Florida panhandle, on a mission to attack and kill any Spaniard or Apalachee natives they came across. Thinking better of this, Jack and a friend stole a longboat under cover of darkness and jumped ship. They landed on the shores of Spanish Florida, near the Cuban fish camp of Zara Zote.

Within the year, Jack, along with his old shipmate Colton, and new friend Martin, took to their stolen vessel and headed south. Inspired by the stories of Henry Avery and William Dampier, they intended to join a pirate crew in the Caribbean.

Coming upon what they thought was a large merchantman at anchor in an otherwise empty bay, they took it upon themselves to attempt to take the vessel. Little did they know that it was actually a pirate frigate known as the Marauder, and the three were quickly taken captive. The Marauder's Captain gave them the option of joining the crew or meeting their end. Thus began their piratical careers.

After a couple years aboard the Marauder, Jack became frustrated. Though valuable seamen, he and his mates were among the youngest aboard, and their ideas and suggestions were rarely if ever taken seriously. Jack's relationship with the ship's captain, a man by the name of Solomon Harlow, was becoming increasingly tenuous. In need of careening, the Marauder was piloted to a safe anchorage by some local fishermen eager to go on the account, and the ship was tipped. Under cover of darkness, Jack and his friends Martin and Colton stole the fishermen's vessel, a small ketch named Vesper.

Sailing north, they found themselves in Port Royal, Jamaica, a sad shell of its former self. While there they were able to quietly and secretly scrounge together a modest crew, and they once again set sail, now with Jack as captain. A short time later, he and his crew commandeered a 20 gun sloop of war that would become his flagship, the Scavenger, while it was at anchor, riding out a storm, in the Corn Islands.

The Scavenger and her crew took advantage of the chaos in the colonies during the War of Spanish Succession, preying on ships off the American colonies and throughout the West Indies with little thought of consequences. By the end of the war, they had become a fixture of the ramshackle port town of Nassau, on New Providence Island.

Jack and the crew were witness to Nassau's growth and rebirth as sailors and pirates alike, drawn to the promise of Spanish gold, streamed into its harbor following the wreck of the 1715 Treasure Fleet.
... See MoreSee Less

Jack Sawford

Captain

Jack Sawford was born in Saint Marys City, Maryland, in 1687. After the explosion of the powder magazine in Saint Peters Freehold rocked the city in 1695, his family relocated to Anne Arundel Town. At the age of 14, he took to sea on a merchant vessel, spending much of his time in and around the West Indies.

At the age of 16, he found himself aboard a resupply ship as part of former Governor Moores expedition bound for the Florida panhandle, on a mission to attack and kill any Spaniard or Apalachee natives they came across. Thinking better of this, Jack and a friend stole a longboat under cover of darkness and jumped ship. They landed on the shores of Spanish Florida, near the Cuban fish camp of Zara Zote.

Within the year, Jack, along with his old shipmate Colton, and new friend Martin, took to their stolen vessel and headed south. Inspired by the stories of Henry Avery and William Dampier, they intended to join a pirate crew in the Caribbean.

Coming upon what they thought was a large merchantman at anchor in an otherwise empty bay, they took it upon themselves to attempt to take the vessel. Little did they know that it was actually a pirate frigate known as the Marauder, and the three were quickly taken captive. The Marauders Captain gave them the option of joining the crew or meeting their end. Thus began their piratical careers.

After a couple years aboard the Marauder, Jack became frustrated. Though valuable seamen, he and his mates were among the youngest aboard, and their ideas and suggestions were rarely if ever taken seriously. Jacks relationship with the ships captain, a man by the name of Solomon Harlow, was becoming increasingly tenuous. In need of careening, the Marauder was piloted to a safe anchorage by some local fishermen eager to go on the account, and the ship was tipped. Under cover of darkness, Jack and his friends Martin and Colton stole the fishermens vessel, a small ketch named Vesper.

Sailing north, they found themselves in Port Royal, Jamaica, a sad shell of its former self. While there they were able to quietly and secretly scrounge together a modest crew, and they once again set sail, now with Jack as captain. A short time later, he and his crew commandeered a 20 gun sloop of war that would become his flagship, the Scavenger, while it was at anchor, riding out a storm, in the Corn Islands.

The Scavenger and her crew took advantage of the chaos in the colonies during the War of Spanish Succession, preying on ships off the American colonies and throughout the West Indies with little thought of consequences. By the end of the war, they had become a fixture of the ramshackle port town of Nassau, on New Providence Island.

Jack and the crew were witness to Nassaus growth and rebirth as sailors and pirates alike, drawn to the promise of Spanish gold, streamed into its harbor following the wreck of the 1715 Treasure Fleet.

Comment on Facebook

A fearsome scaly wag looks to be about some mischief ashore ☠

Friday July 10th, 2020 - 5:30 pm

Timeline Photos#OnThisDay in 1726 - "A Sermon Preached to Some Miserable Pirates"

These pirates were understandably miserable as they prepared for their execution the next day! 1726 is near the end of period when piracy was being stamped out in the colonies. The reference at the top is Hebrews 10:31, “It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the Living God." Rev. Benjamin Colman was a famous Boston-born clergyman who himself was captured by pirates in 1695, ransomed to England, and returned to Boston in 1699.
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The Crew of the Scavenger added 3 new photos.
The Crew of the Scavenger

Sunday August 9th, 2015 - 6:06 pm

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Image attachmentImage attachment
The Crew of the Scavenger added a new photo.
The Crew of the Scavenger

Sunday August 9th, 2015 - 6:06 pm

Tobias Martinson ... See MoreSee Less

Tobias Martinson

Friday May 15th, 2020 - 4:30 pm

The Scavenger started it's life as an English sloop of war. She was built as the HMS Eurybia in the Woolwich Shipyards on the River Thames and launched in 1703. The ship was 94 feet on deck, just shy of 77 feet at the keel, with a maximum width of 26 feet, and a burden of 276 tons. She was outfitted with 20 English 6 pound cannon.

Only a year after launch, the Eurybia was captured by the Spanish Navy in 1704. The ship was repurposed as a heavily armed supply ship for Spain's territories in the Americas and the West Indies. While riding out a violent storm at anchor in the Corn Islands in 1706, she was seized by Jack Sawford and his crew after their ketch had been driven onto the island's reefs.

She was rechristened The Scavenger, though the figurehead of the Greek goddess of the mastery of the seas, Eurybia, with her heart of flint, was left intact. From there, the crew of the Scavenger began raiding and pillaging the Americas. By 1720, she was a very old ship, but still fast, and the crew was fond of her. For them, the repairs were well worth keeping her afloat as long as she served her purpose.

Special thanks to Daniel Siemens from Tradewind Bottling, without whom such a beautiful model could never have been realized.
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Is this your ship?

Very nice detail for the small scale. I love doing ship in bottles. I like doing marlinespike seamanship even more.

The Crew of the Scavenger added 20 new photos.
The Crew of the Scavenger

Thursday May 14th, 2020 - 1:03 pm

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Comment on Facebook

If there were cameras in 1720, I'm sure this is what the pictures would look like. Nicely done Gentlemen!

Can you please point me in the right direction on flag construction info? I want to hand sew a reproduction myself but have had trouble finding good info.

What fun! Where was this encampment?

Martha Veto Dawn Fowler Melina E. Hughes Margaret Gowan Walker Joyce Neuse Lisa Cummins Nola Hamrick Look! Pirates! 😍

Manuel Minero Milton Cofresi. Marineros

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Wednesday May 6th, 2020 - 3:12 pm

The first colonists at Jamestown spent the last days of April and first two weeks of May 1607 exploring the James River, searching for a suitable site for their colony. Working ships like SUSAN CONSTANT, GODSPEED, and DISCOVERY up a river could be a tedious process - using a favorable breeze when possible and drifting with the tide at other times.

One method they may have employed was kedging. This process required a small anchor - a kedge anchor - to be rowed out ahead of the ship and dropped. The anchor cable was then hauled in, slowly pulling the ship up (or down) the river. At the same time, another anchor was rowed out ahead of the vessel and dropped. Once the first anchor was home, it was again rowed out ahead and dropped, while the second anchor was being hauled in. While this was a very slow process, it was effective in light winds and areas without a stong tidal current.

The image below illustrates the process - with a red anchor and cable for the ship's port anchor and a green one for the starboard anchor. It also shows how the anchor could be hung under a small boat for easy dropping.

One of the most famous instances of kedging a ship took place 205 years after Jamestown's settlement during the War of 1812. Check out that story from our friends at USS Constitution Museum:

ussconstitutionmuseum.org/major-events/escaping-a-british-squadron/

Thanks to our historical interpreter Kelly Lowry for the original artwork for this post!
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Excellent descriptive image.

Very hard work.

Friday May 1st, 2020 - 1:35 pm

Timeline Photos320 years ago today, a young man named John Lawson sailed from England to the New World. He had been assured by a gentleman who had recently returned from there “that Carolina was the best country I would go to.” He would eventually journey through North Carolina and write a book about his travels called “A New Voyage to Carolina.” Some of the plants he wrote about, like the Dogwood and the Pine Tree, have become widely recognized symbols of the State of North Carolina today. #ncsymbolsparty #ncsymbols #ncstatecapitol #nchistoricsites #historicbath #historicbathnc #bathlife #thisdayinhistory ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Ha, ha, ha... no. Virginia, my lads, t'is the place ye wish to settle. Wherefore would anyone wish for North Carolina...😉

Didn’t work out too well. The Tuscarora beheaded him.

Monday April 27th, 2020 - 6:30 pm

_CREW PROFILE_

Walter Henshaw

Ship's Surgeon
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Wednesday April 15th, 2020 - 10:25 pm

An attempt to illustrate what New Providence Island, Nassau included, was like during the Golden Age of Piracy, from the town and it's inhabitants, to the islands biomes, flora and fauna included.This is an attempt to illustrate what New Providence Island, Nassau included, was like during the Golden Age of Piracy, from the town and it's inhabitants, to the islands biomes, flora and fauna included.

(PHOTOS ARE GROUPED WITH RELATED PHOTOS AS BEST AS POSSIBLE)

A coppice is an area of many trees growing close together, with heavy shade. The Bahamas are home to two types of coppice, the Blackland Coppice, and the Whiteland Coppice.

The Blackland Coppice Biome is no longer much represented on New Providence, but it was still holding on during the early 18th century. They grow in island interiors, their tall canopy casting a gloom on the nearly bare forest floor, where wind and light seldom penetrates. Trees that grow in such a biome include Mahogany, Horseflesh, Mastic, Pigeon Plum, and Cedar.

The Whiteland Coppice Biome consists of trees and shrubs that are rugged and durable. Flora found in this biome include Brasiletto, Haulback, Mahogany, Sea Grape, Balsam, Clusia, and the painful to touch Manchineel. Also thriving in this biome are the somewhat silly sounding dildo cactus, as well as the prickly pear cactus. This biome is often in close proximity to the sea. As such, a few species of land crabs make their homes in the soil, including the Giant White Land Crab, and the Black Land crab.
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Wednesday April 15th, 2020 - 10:19 pm

_CREW PROFILE_

Red Herring "Cutter"

Ship's Carpenter
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Tuesday April 14th, 2020 - 2:54 pm

A while left before we next tip the ship.

January can't come soon enough.

Photos from the 1720 Scavenger Careening Encampment
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Comment on Facebook

Amazing photo! What is the format of the event? Do you spend few days there? Is there a possibility to participate? And another question - some people are seen wearing sleeveless waistcoats - is there any historical pictures or descriptions to support it? I want to make one for myself, but can’t find reliable sources.

Totally would love to do this

Awesome

Tuesday April 14th, 2020 - 1:49 pm

_CREW PROFILE_

Solomon Crumpsley

Sailing Master

Son of an Anglican minister of Tory persuasion, Solomon Crumpsley entered this world the year of our Lord 1688, in the village of Cowley, Oxfordshire. A studious lad intended for the pulpit, Crumpsley excelled in his studies and in the year of the Great Storm (1703) gained admittance to Jesus College, University of Oxford, as a servitor (work-student). Not content with the treatment servitors received from the other students, Crumps (as he was known) took employment in a coffee-house, supplementing his pay by tutoring in a variety of subjects prior to obtaining his first degree at age 19. While awaiting appointment to a parish and pursuing further studies, Crumps continued his employ while publishing a number of minor pamphlets on the Christian duty to be a peacemaker, paralleling the growing opposition to Queen Anne’s War among his fellow Tories and whose verbiage brought attention from the Whiggish opposition…as well as the eye of his master’s daughter. Soon finding himself confronted with scandal (the veracity of which is still being debated to this day) and a loss of employ, Crumps was forced to look elsewhere to complete his studies. Having developed a sympathy toward his nonconforming countrymen (despite their support of the Whigs) as a result of questioning the high church position in the aftermath of the Sacheverell riots (1709), Crumps found the lack of a religious test for admittance to the university in Glasgow, in combination with its distance from the young damsel (and baby which may or may not have been his), to be quite attractive.

It had not been Crumpsley’s intention to study medicine, but falling into the company of a practitioner of Physick in that town who agreed to take him on as an apprentice (along with providing food and board while he continued his studies), his exploration of anatomy and medicinal preparations began. Studies at Glasgow were seasonal, with lectures on medicinal plants in the summer as winter was a more favorable season for dissecting cadavers. Cadavers were in short supply, however, and the university waived class fees for anatomy students who could provide them by any means necessary. During one of the midnight raids on a fresh grave that resulted, Crumps' life was forever changed. Typically a mere misdemeanor if caught with a body, one of the students in his gang of body snatchers (a freshman on his first raid) secreted away the clothing and possessions of the deceased against the exhortations of the older students, which upon being discovered following the gang’s capture turned the misdemeanor into a felony worthy of transportation to the colonies as an indentured convict servant. Sentenced to 3 years of servitude, Crumpsley set sail in 1710 aboard the Dove, bound for Barbados, in chains.

Following two weeks at sea, a storm arose casting the Dove ashore on the Sallee coast of Barbary, where its few survivors (Crumpsley among them) were enslaved by the Moors. Purchased by an Arab apothecary, Crumps worked in his kitchen and prepared medicinals between beatings by day while at night the doctor tried to force his conversion to the Mohammedan persuasion, going so far as to force him to adopt the Moorish habit as if he was a renegado who had already given up his faith. The forced habit was fortuitous, however, as it enabled him to secret away more easily in the night where, having come upon a small boat, he was able to free himself from Barbary after 14 months of enslavement. Floating into the sea lanes, the small boat was sighted by the Massachusettes slaver the Ann galley, Wm. Wyer, master, who gave Crumpsley a berth as Surgeon’s mate for the duration of the voyage. During the months collecting slaves along the coasts of Whydah and Calabar, Crumpsley passed the time by studying the surgery and physick unique to shipboard life and that trade in addition to navigation (having discovered he had an aptitude for such calculations) by borrowing some books and charts from the sailing master.

August of 1712 found the Ann arriving in Port Royal, Jamaica, along with the rest of the London fleet being held there out of fear following the recent French attack on Montserrat. Restricted by the governor from sailing further, the ship and its cargo sank alongside 54 other vessels during the severe hurricane that struck on the 28th of the aforesaid month, killing over 400 seamen. Though he survived, a wave tossed Crumpsley hard against the gunwales of the Anne, rendering him incapacitated with a paralytic condition in his lower extremities. Now aged 25, Crumpsley spent the year 1713 recuperating from his injuries and sustaining himself by playing fiddle and the negro strum-strum as a curiosity in the tavern in which he was boarded. By God’s great mercy, Crumps regained much of the function in his limbs and was soon able to travel, thus allowing him to serve as a plantation physician and tutor for a number of prominent families (the Ashworth’s in particular) with holdings further inland to pay off his accrued debts.

Crumpsley did not pay Jacobitism much mind during his days in Glasgow, but with the full proscription against Tories by the Hanoverian King and his Whig supporters going into effect in 1715 he increasingly began to develop sympathies for their goal of overthrowing the crown and restoring the Stuart line (monarchs chosen by God as the divine right of kings instead of a foreign turnip-man usurping the throne through marriage). Meanwhile, life continued with administering medicinals and surgery to the families and slaves at various plantations, tutoring the Ashworth children in a number of subjects when able, and periodically punctuating this existence with short trading voyages to Carolina as sailing-master aboard master Ashworth’s sloop. That is until Crumps secured a position as sailing-master and physician aboard a privateer being fitted out by Mr. Ashworth and a number of other investors to protect the island in the aftermath of depredations committed by Spanish Guarda Costas.

Following a short, leaky, voyage, the privateer returned in November of 1715 when news arrived of the Spaniard's lost treasure fleet somewhere on the coast of Florida. With Captains Jennings and Vane discovering the location of the treasure as being at Palmar de Ays, the privateer quickly joined their vessels for an attack against the salvage camp in late December. Returning from the raid in January of 1716, the privateers landed at Nassau to disburse each man's shares of the captured coins and to enjoy recreation alongside Hornigold's crews already there, bringing the islands' population to nearly 1,000. Having returned to Jamaica by the 26th, word spread quickly, and Crumpsley immediately took a mates' berth aboard a wrecker and returned to Florida to continue "fishing the wrecks." Under pressure from both the Spanish and English governments, Governor Hamilton ordered the "fishing" operations to end in April, just before his removal as governor of Jamaica in May. Suddenly Crumspley and the other wreckers found themselves outlaws, and instead of returning to Jamaica set sail for Nassau where they formed the "flying gang" under the overall command of Capt. Jennings. Residing in Nassau with his shares from fishing the wrecks and attacking the salvage camps, Crumpsley was enjoying all the island had to offer when he was approached by the captain of a familiar vessel looking for a sailing-master. A vessel who had also been seen fishing the wrecks a few months previously: the Scavenger.
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Pirate Fest - In Attendance
Cedar Key Pirate Invasion
Fort Taylor Pirate Invasion
John Levique Pirate Days - Madeira Bch
Country United States of America
State/Province Florida
distance: 30 Miles
Address Florida, United States
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